CBCA Clayton’s awards

We had a black dog road trip last night as Melissa, Audrey and myself went along to the CBCA Claytons night in Victoria.
First of all congratulations must go to Pam McIntyre who was this years recipient of the Leila St John Award. Well done, Pam!

Events like this are always interesting – any time that people are prepared to stand in front of a group and offer up their opinion on something is always going to be interesting. And, generate some comment I guess.

I find it fascinating how different people interpret different things and last night left me with a lot of questions. For example, does a book that is nominated in the information category necessarily have to be an academic tome? Can it have a bit of colour and movement and (dare I say it?) story? And is it ok to give an eight-year-old a book that they may find unsettling? Do we sometimes not challenge our kids for fear that their feelings will be hurt? And are we ever going to decide exactly what a picture book is and who they are aimed at?

I don’t know the answers and I don’t pretend to but I would love to hear your thoughts.

Kristen

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One Response to CBCA Clayton’s awards

  1. Genre definitions seem so blurred around the edges now that it is hard to classify books. So many innovative authors stretching boundaries.

    I read a blog post recently that discussed the need for non-fiction books to become more approachable and entertaining if they want to successfully compete with the internet. I love reading non-fiction/information books and particularly appreciate books that make some effort to be interesting as well as informative.

    As for giving children something that will challenge them, this depends on the child and situation. My children (10, 8 and 5) all love books and are happy to discuss what they are reading with me. I am happy for them to read things that challenge them mentally and emotionally in an age-appropriate way if I can follow up by chatting with them about the story and how it made them feel/think.

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